The concept of healing others and oneself has been in practice for thousands of years. Natural healing methods have been the norm since time began, “modern medicine” being a relatively recent (and inordinately lucrative) invention. Finding the simplest holistic ways to treat our injuries and ailments both physically and mentally can provide us with the balance we need to find peace in life. For reasons like this, cannabis has been at the center of medicine in multiple cultures all over the world throughout history.

A non-religious group of nuns in Central Valley, California, the Sisters of the Valley, have entered into the dual role of both cannabusiness entrepreneurs and healers. With their ancient spiritual practices and goal of healing people through cannabis without mood-altering tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), leaders Sister Kate and Sister Darcey have begun to make quite a name for themselves in this growing industry with their own unique brand of topical cannabis, tinctures, and extracts.

Carefully tending the flock

The Sisters of the Valley cultivate cannabis so low in THC that it qualifies not as “marijuana” but as hemp (less than 0.3 percent is the legal definition of hemp). Instead of THC, the Sisters market a variety of products featuring cannabidiol (CBD), the “miracle medical molecule”, which can aid in relieving stress, anxiety, and pain, among many other conditions.

The Sisters regularly use items as sage and palo santo oil as part of cultivating their products in good spirit. All the products are free of pesticides, made with all-natural ingredients, and lab tested to verify authenticity and potency. Fittingly, faithful customers log in to testify about their health blessings received from the Sisters, in a chorus of praise.

An excerpt from the Sisters of the Valley website reads: “We, The Sisters, prepare all medicines during moon cycles, according to ancient wisdom. We are activists on a mission to empower people to heal themselves.” This is essentially the mantra they live by while standing up for their belief in the human right to cannabis, health, and happiness.

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On a mission to heal

According to Merry Jane, Sister Kate told ABC News, “We make CBD oil, which takes away seizures and a million other things. It’s very high in demand from cancer patients right now. And we make a salve that’s a multi-purpose salve, but we found out it cures migraines, hangovers, earaches, toothaches, and diaper rash.”

While it may not be a “cannacea” or cure-all, cannabis does carry a seemingly never-ending potential to help and heal. To complement the life-enhancing power inherent in the herb, the Sisters of the Valley pray over every product with sincere intent to help make someone else’s life better. (How many bottles of Big Pharma pills receive the same treatment?) Consuming something grown with love and care as well as the intent to benefit the body-temple is an affirmative way to work in harmony with nature. As a bonus, CBD is famously non-toxic and well tolerated, typically without side effects.

The Sisters of the Valley are are ambitiously taking strides to make the world a better place, one bottle of CBD-infused goodness at a time. In a world full of sick people being fed toxic chemical cocktails manufactured by faceless drug corporations that don’t get the job done, it feels good to know that the Sisters of the Valley are on our side.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Garyn AngelGaryn Angel is an inventor, award-winning financial consultant, and CEO of MagicalButter.com, maker of the botanical extractor he invented for infusing cannabis into foods. Firmly committed to needed legal reform, Angel was named to the exclusive CNBC NEXT LIST of visionary global business leaders for his work on legal marijuana. He is also founder of the Cheers to Goodness Foundation, a charity that helps “medical refugees”—mainly veterans and children—who need herbal therapy when traditional treatment options have failed.